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What is the Healthy Transportation Coalition?

 

 

 




Members of the Healthy Transportation Coalition believe there are many needed improvements in the National Capital Region before we will have a truly healthy transportation network. 

Tell us what you think! Take our survey on Integrating Equity in Transport! 

We need better pedestrian, cycling and public transportation infrastructure. Communities that are home to vulnerable populations should have excellent access to healthy transportation options. 

Complete Streets that serve all modes of transportation and users, no matter their age or abilities, need to be built in these communities. And, we also need Complete Streets leading to and from public transit stations, schools, green spaces, and areas of our cities that contain local businesses. 

Improving the linkages between existing cycling, pedestrian, high-occupancy vehicle transportation networks should also be highly prioritized.

With a focus on community organizing, research, the need for effective policy and infrastructure, our members fund and co-create projects to build more livable communities.

VALUE PROPOSITION: If we all work together, as members of the Healthy Transportation Coalition, we will make more progress, more quickly.

  • Upcoming events

    Vanier neighbourhood meeting
    Thursday, September 19, 2019 at 06:00 PM · 2 rsvps
    Vanier Community Service Centre in Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Bay Ward Neighbourhood Team Meeting
    Wednesday, September 25, 2019 at 06:00 PM · 3 rsvps
    See all events
  • From the blog

    Parking rates and transit fares

    We have been drawing attention to the need to increase parking rates in Ottawa, for a few years, and we might be making progress. Progress is sorely needed.

    The cost of metered on-street one- and two-hour parking rates have been frozen in Ottawa since 2008. Meanwhile, the City of Ottawa has increased OC Transpo single-ride transit fares by 80% since 2008.

    A single-ride on OC Transpo used to cost $2 in 2008. Fares will increase to $3.60 per ride later this year (once Light Rail Transit launches).

     

    Why would people choose to ride transit instead of driving their cars if transit user fees are always increasing? Sadly, the City is planning to increase public transit user fees every year by 2.5%.

    We think this sends the wrong signal. More should be done to encourage people to ride transit, because more people riding public transit will reduce air pollution, and it will help lessen congestion

    Due to our work, scrutiny is being placed on frozen on-street parking rates. As noted in the Ottawa Citizen, a report is being written for Council's consideration that may recommend improvements. We hope improvements include ending the apparent tax advantage provided to surface parking lots in the downtown.

    On a related note, in the previous term of City Council, we worked with City Councillors so that consideration would be given to easing road congestion. In 2016, this led to a vote at City Council that unfortunately went the wrong way (read On congestion causes and solutions, Ottawa turns its back on reason).

    Some Councillors were undeterred, however, and they found money in their office budgets to fund a study on congestion and possible solutions, which was released at an event we hosted in March 2017. The report recommended the best way to reduce congestion in Ottawa would be to increase parking rates.

    The Healthy Transportation Coalition will continue to push for increased parking rates, and more affordable public transit.

    We will also continue to push for using parking revenue to fund more sustainable transportation, such as bike parking at bus stops to encourage multi-modal transportation. In our work related to Budgets 2018, and 2019, and thanks to the leadership of Councillors Keith Egli and Shawn Menard, we won $30,000 each year to fund ring-and-post bike parking at bus stops.

    There is still so much more we need to do to improve the situation, and with your help, we can get there. Please become a member or donate to support our work today.

     

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    The safety of our streets is a public health issue

    Dear Mayor Watson and City Councillors,

    A public conversation is happening in Ottawa about how our streets can be made safe for all. Last month, hundreds took part in a silent bike ride following the tragic death of a cyclist on Laurier Avenue, in front of City Hall. People are speaking up in the mainstream media, on social media and in messages to you, their representatives. It’s clear that many in our community want change.   

    Two important motions to protect everyone who uses our streets are coming to Council on June 12. The first calls for Council to adopt a strong Vision Zero policy and make immediate changes to protect vulnerable road users. The second asks Council to dedicate the $57-million federal gas tax transfer to making our cycling network safe.

    We ask that you pass both motions in full and begin the urgent work needed to make our streets safe for all. It’s a matter of public health.

    A strong Vision Zero policy, properly funded, would improve the health of our community in several ways.

    Many municipalities in Canada and around the world have already adopted Vision Zero— an ethical approach to transportation that makes safety the top priority. Under Vision Zero, no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable, and the transportation system is designed to prevent them.

    Bringing Ottawa’s streets up to the Vision Zero standard would save lives and prevent life-changing injuries that result from collisions. No one should be at risk of death or serious injury on our streets.

    But the health benefits wouldn’t stop there. A Vision Zero approach would also encourage the active modes of transportation that make us, our communities and our environments healthier.

    An investment in Vision Zero streets is an investment in the health of our children and youth. The expert statement in the 2018 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth—the most comprehensive assessment of child and youth physical activity in Canada—notes that active children and youth are healthier, with improved heart, bone and muscle health, as well as a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes. These experts also point to evidence that active children and youth think better, learn better, and have better emotional, psychological and social well-being.

    Sadly, the Report Card revealed a grade of D− for active transportation among children and youth in Canada—much worse than the global average of C. Only 21% of 5- to 19-year-olds in Canada typically use active modes of transportation to get to and from school. The numbers for Ottawa aren’t any more encouraging: the Ottawa Community Wellbeing Report 2018 noted that only 25% of 12- to 17-year-olds in our city get the recommended amount of physical activity each day—the equivalent of a D− grade.

    What would happen to these numbers if Vision Zero routes for children and youth to walk and bike to schools, community and recreation centres, parks, and other places, were a priority?  

    The shift to Vision Zero will require significant financial resources. It is a necessary investment in public health and safety with a substantial return. The Ottawa Cycling Plan, for example, cites an estimate from Ottawa Public Health that a 5% increase in the city’s cycling mode share can result in an annual benefit of $16 million. We need much more of this kind of broad analysis to inform spending at all levels of government.

    The shift to Vision Zero will also require long-term, forward thinking and leadership (“vision”!). We ask you to lead now by passing the two safe streets motions in full on June 12. The result will be a safer and healthier city.   

     

    Sincerely,

     

    Richard Annett, Executive Director, Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre

    Naini Cloutier, Executive Director, Somerset West Community Health Centre

    David Gibson, Executive Director, Sandy Hill Community Health Centre

    Simone Thibault, Executive Director, Centretown Community Health Centre

    Mark Tremblay, Director, Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute; Professor and Scientist, Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa; President, Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance

    Michelle Perry, Member-at-Large, Board of Directors, Healthy Transportation Coalition

     

     

     

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